Cuando se habla de los Soñadores, jóvenes que luchan por la reforma migratoria, típicamente se habla de su confianza, energía y de su extraordinaria capacidad para seguir sus sueños. Pero casi nunca se habla de los procesos psicológicos internos que muchas veces se esconden tras sus gritos de protesta y la imagen agradable que muestran… Continue »

El viernes 22 de junio de 2012 fui a la presentación del libro Undocumented and Unafraid, el segundo libro del UCLA Center for Labor Research and Education, que cuenta las historias de los Soñadores en sus propias voces. Kent Wong, el director del UCLA Downtown Labor Center, habló de lo mucho que ha cambiado el… Continue »

The Obama administration is quietly halting some deportations of undocumented young people, after a memo in June that directed immigration officials to consider reprieve for students and would-be military members. Meanwhile, young people facing deportation are still forced to jump through hoops to stay in the United States.

His middle name is Diego, so I’m going to call him that, and I’ll tell you he’s 23. But if I give away too much identifying information, he’s sure to lose his job. Or worse. Diego, who works in retail, was born in Mexico and got some tough news when he was 8.

Alberto Yanez is a hard-working student, a committed young father, and an ambitious DREAMer. He came to the United States from Mexico in 1988 when he was just a year old. Raised in California, Yanez moved to Washington with his family after his junior year in high school. He has been living there ever since.

On Wednesday, a flight is leaving for India and President Obama’s immigration officials want Mandeep — a DREAM Act student — on it, despite the fact that she was once voted as “Most Likely to Save the World” by her peers at Los Altos High School in Mountain View.

We dedicate this post to the many DREAMers who are graduating from high school and college this spring. To those students: keep hope alive, and continue to inspire us all with your hard work and dedication to your dreams.

“Officially a Doctor of Law! This J.D. degree is for the DREAM movement. Victory will be ours!” César Vargas wrote on his Facebook wall this past weekend after receiving his law degree. Graduation ceremonies are held all throughout the country and among these students, who through immense effort are graduating from college, are hundreds of thousands like César, undocumented students with enormous potential to offer to this country.

We want actions, not words. For nearly two decades I’ve called the United States of America my home. I emigrated from Ecuador with my family, grew up in Miami and attended public schools, where I was a high-achieving student who eventually made it to college. I am also an undocumented immigrant.

Today, DREAMer Tolu Olubunmi, would-be chemical engineer (if only she was allowed to practice her profession), spoke at a press conference reintroducing the DREAM Act with Senators Durbin (D-IL), Reid (D-NV) and Menendez (D-NJ), and was introduced by Durbin as someone whose “misfortune has been our good fortune” as someone, despite her undocumented status, often volunteers full-time to better the lives of thousands of others.