Press Releases

11/28/11 | In the recent dustup over Newt Gingrich's limited but sensible recognition of the simple fact that America will not and should not move to expel 11 million undocumented immigrants, many of whom have lived and worked here for well over a decade, Mitt Romney's current position on immigration reform has become clear: anything short of mass deportation is "amnesty." | Read More »

11/28/11 | In the recent dustup over Newt Gingrich's limited but sensible recognition of the simple fact that America will not and should not move to expel 11 million undocumented immigrants, many of whom have lived and worked here for well over a decade, Mitt Romney's current position on immigration reform has become clear: anything short of mass deportation is "amnesty." | Read More »

11/23/11 | At last night's Republican presidential debate, the issue of immigration erupted. The candidates were finally forced to go beyond their hollow sound bites about securing the border first and to confront the question of what to do with the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently settled in the United States. Newt Gingrich, who has been emerging as the alternative to Mitt Romney, reiterated his view that for at least some undocumented immigrants who are deeply rooted in America, there should be a path to legal status -- but not citizenship. Gingrich said, "I don't see how the party that says it's the party of the family is going to adopt an immigration policy which destroys families that have been here a quarter century, and I'm prepared to take the heat for saying, let's be humane in enforcing the law without giving them citizenship but by finding a way to create legality so that they are not separated from their families." | Read More »

11/23/11 | At last night's Republican presidential debate, the issue of immigration erupted. The candidates were finally forced to go beyond their hollow sound bites about securing the border first and to confront the question of what to do with the 11 million undocumented immigrants currently settled in the United States. Newt Gingrich, who has been emerging as the alternative to Mitt Romney, reiterated his view that for at least some undocumented immigrants who are deeply rooted in America, there should be a path to legal status -- but not citizenship. Gingrich said, "I don't see how the party that says it's the party of the family is going to adopt an immigration policy which destroys families that have been here a quarter century, and I'm prepared to take the heat for saying, let's be humane in enforcing the law without giving them citizenship but by finding a way to create legality so that they are not separated from their families." | Read More »

11/22/11 | Yesterday, 3400 people joined Members of Congress and state civic, civil rights, and religious leaders at the historic 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham to protest Alabama's Draconian, "papers, please" anti-immigrant law and to support the effort to repeal the legislation. | Read More »

11/22/11 | Yesterday, 3400 people joined Members of Congress and state civic, civil rights, and religious leaders at the historic 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham to protest Alabama's Draconian, "papers, please" anti-immigrant law and to support the effort to repeal the legislation. | Read More »

11/22/11 | According to some supporters of Alabama's worst-in-the-nation immigration law – figures such as State Senator Scott Beason, Congressman Mo Brooks (R-AL), U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL), anti-immigrant leader Mark Krikorian, and immigration law architect and current Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R) – the state's "papers, please" anti-immigration law is working exactly as they intended. | Read More »

11/22/11 | According to some supporters of Alabama's worst-in-the-nation immigration law – figures such as State Senator Scott Beason, Congressman Mo Brooks (R-AL), U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions (R-AL), anti-immigrant leader Mark Krikorian, and immigration law architect and current Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach (R) – the state's "papers, please" anti-immigration law is working exactly as they intended. | Read More »

11/17/11 | The controversy continues over the Alabama anti-immigration law, as leaders report on additional damage to the state's reputation, economy, and efforts to move on from its Civil Rights era legacy. | Read More »

11/17/11 | The controversy continues over the Alabama anti-immigration law, as leaders report on additional damage to the state's reputation, economy, and efforts to move on from its Civil Rights era legacy. | Read More »

11/16/11 | Yesterday, former Republican congressman and current Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam criticized the harsh anti-immigration laws passed in neighboring states Alabama and Georgia, pointing out that the laws are already having real economic consequences and arguing that Florida show not follow this path. | Read More »

11/15/11 | The implementation of Alabama's HB 56, the harshest anti-immigrant law in the nation, has touched off a humanitarian crisis felt throughout the state and across the nation. Families, paralyzed by fear and uncertainty, are fleeing the state in droves and children are afraid to go school or even leave their homes. | Read More »

11/15/11 | Last night, on NBC's "Rock Center with Brian Williams," reporter Kate Snow did a segment on what Williams called the "huge controversy" in Alabama caused by the passage of the state's "papers, please" HB 56 anti-immigration law. | Read More »

11/15/11 | Last night, on NBC's "Rock Center with Brian Williams," reporter Kate Snow did a segment on what Williams called the "huge controversy" in Alabama caused by the passage of the state's "papers, please" HB 56 anti-immigration law. | Read More »

11/14/11 | The fallout continues over last week's recall election of Arizona State Senator Russell Pearce (R), the architect of that state's"papers, please" anti-immigration law. As analysts ask what the result might mean for the future of anti-immigrant extremism and for Arizona's potential competitiveness in the 2012 elections, Pearce's ideological allies are spinning the results to a foregone conclusion -- that the anti-immigrant policies weren't the problem, just the tone and messenger associated with them. | Read More »

11/14/11 | The fallout continues over last week's recall election of Arizona State Senator Russell Pearce (R), the architect of that state's"papers, please" anti-immigration law. As analysts ask what the result might mean for the future of anti-immigrant extremism and for Arizona's potential competitiveness in the 2012 elections, Pearce's ideological allies are spinning the results to a foregone conclusion -- that the anti-immigrant policies weren't the problem, just the tone and messenger associated with them. | Read More »

11/11/11 | Asked on Wednesday by Antonieta Cadiz of La Opinion, the nation's leading Spanish language newspaper, for his opinion on Alabama's controversial law, HB 56, Obama was emphatic in his remarks, saying "It's a bad law. The idea that we have children afraid to go to school, because they feel afraid that their immigration status will lead to being detained is wrong. This makes the law, not just anti-immigrant, but I believe it doesn't match our essential values as a country," he affirmed. | Read More »

11/11/11 | Asked on Wednesday by Antonieta Cadiz of La Opinion, the nation's leading Spanish language newspaper, for his opinion on Alabama's controversial law, HB 56, Obama was emphatic in his remarks, saying "It's a bad law. The idea that we have children afraid to go to school, because they feel afraid that their immigration status will lead to being detained is wrong. This makes the law, not just anti-immigrant, but I believe it doesn't match our essential values as a country," he affirmed. | Read More »