According to the Associated Press, Judge Blackburn has blocked enforcement of the Alabama’s anti-immigrant law.

In rural Alabama lies Cullman County, recognized as the “state’s top agricultural community.” David Palmer of The Cullman Times interviewed two farmers who express concern over Alabama’s new anti-immigration law, which is scheduled to take effect in three days on September 1st. Both farmers come to the same consensus. To put it succinctly: this new law stinks.

After a long, hot summer of protests and lawsuits, Alabama’s tough new immigration law is scheduled to begin taking effect this week.

THE OBAMA administration’s new initiative to direct federal resources toward deporting the most dangerous of the people who enter the country illegally, rather than treating all illegals equally, makes good sense.

Undocumented students who study in and graduate from California’s public schools are one step closer to having the educational opportunities they deserve. The possibility that they can secure public financial aid is closer than ever before.

The law, which takes effect Sept. 1, is so inhumane that four Alabama church leaders have sued to block it, saying it criminalizes acts of Christian compassion. It is a sweeping attempt to terrorize undocumented immigrants in every aspect of their lives.

Alabama law enforcement agencies aren’t ready to enforce certain provisions of the new immigration law that go into effect Thursday.The bill signed by Gov. Robert Bentley requires agencies to begin checking the status of suspected illegal immigrants during normal traffic stops.

Osvaldo Compian-Torres is caught in the most significant dragnet in the federal criminal court system. But he isn’t a murderer, drug trafficker or money launderer. Compian-Torres’ conviction earlier this year in Dallas was for re-entry into the United States after deportation.

A Washington Post editorial notes that Governor Rick Perry (R-TX) is just the latest candidate to use “the usual Republican crutch to justify his position, insisting that the border must be made secure before reform is possible. But the border is more secure than it has been in decades, as measured by the soaring federal presence and plummeting rates of illegal crossings and crime on the frontier.

As the Republican presidential primary battle starts to heat up, two recent articles analyze the Party’s positioning on immigration reform and standing with Latino voters. Border Security First – the “Usual Republican Crutch” on Immigration: A new Washington Post editorial notes that Governor Rick Perry (R-TX) is just the latest candidate to use “the usual Republican crutch to justify his position, insisting that the border must be made secure before reform is possible.