Immigration advocates have filed a lawsuit on behalf of several married gay couples, alleging a federal law violates their constitutional rights by preventing them from sponsoring their spouses for green cards.

The U.S. Justice Department said Tuesday that America’s self-proclaimed toughest sheriff was negotiating in bad faith, jeopardizing efforts to settle civil rights charges stemming from allegations of racial profiling against Latinos.

Sixty-eight House Congressmen joined forces today in a charge against Arizona’s arch-anti-immigrant law SB 1070, releasing an amicus curiae brief to the Supreme Court which argues that immigration is a federal rather than a state priority.

Sixty-eight House Congressmen joined forces today in a charge against Arizona’s arch-anti-immigrant law SB 1070, releasing an amicus curiae brief to the Supreme Court which argues that immigration is a federal rather than a state priority.

While the Supreme Court justices took up health care, opponents of Arizona’s extreme immigration law looked ahead. Eleven attorneys general filed an amicus brief on Monday in support of the federal government’s suit against the law, SB 1070, which the Supreme Court will hear in April.

In a brief filed Tuesday, the Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to find unconstitutional Arizona’s law aimed at cracking down on illegal immigrants. “Petitioners assert that Arizona’s status as a border State that is particularly affected by illegal immigrationjustifies its adoption of its own policy directed to foreign nationals.

Yesterday, the 11th Circuit Court of appeals in Atlanta, Georgia blocked two more parts of the Alabama anti-immigrant law. Human Rights Watch noted the decision as “a significant victory not just for immigrants but for the rights of all residents of Alabama.” Their press release gives a little more background.

Breaking news from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals concerning Alabama’s atrocious anti-immigrant law. Two of the most punitive sections of that law have been blocked.

A federal appeals court pressed Georgia and Alabama attorneys Thursday on whether the states’ new laws targeting illegal immigration conflict with federal rules and challenged critics of the crackdown to explain why local authorities can’t use the measures to complement federal efforts.

Today in Atlanta a three judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit will hear arguments over Alabama’s and Georgia’s anti-immigration laws. In mid-April, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments about Arizona’s “show me your papers” law S.B. 1070, the precursor to the Alabama and Georgia anti-immigrant initiatives.