Alabama lawmakers took the first step Thursday toward amending — but not repealing — the state’s contested immigration law. Republican House Speaker Mike Hammon filed a bill that would make changes to H.B. 56, a partially blocked law that allows police and other government officials to inquire about citizenship status in a number of situations.

A bill proposing changes to Alabama’s illegal immigration law has been introduced in the House. HB 658 by Rep Micky Hammon.

Yesterday, I had the privilege of representing America’s Voice Education Fund, alongside Renata Soto of National Council of La Raza and Fred Redmond of the United Steel Workers and the AFL-CIO, at the Daimler AG shareholder meeting with more than 6,000 attendees in Berlin, Germany.

The Mississippi legislature’s anti-immigrant bill, HB 488, is dead for the session, after failing to move in the State Senate. That led The Birmingham News’ Joey Kennedy to write, “As bad as our Legislature is, I never thought I’d have to say that even Mississippi’s Legislature is smarter than ours.”

The American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) has been in the news a lot lately. As we’ve reported, a lot of activists, including some of our allies in immigration advocacy, have been trying to expose ALEC and its shady dealings for awhile. It’s working. Coca-Cola and Pepsi have ended their sponsorship of ALEC

Civil rights leaders traveled to Berlin this week to ask Mercedes executives to speak out against Alabama’s anti-immigrant law. The delegation is part of an effort to pressure Alabama’s top automakers — Honda, Hyundai and Daimler AG — to oppose Alabama’s HB 56, known as the toughest immigration law in the country.

As bad as our Legislature is, I never thought I’d have to say that even Mississippi’s Legislature is smarter than ours. But it is, at least where immigration policy is concerned.

Today, a delegation representing civil rights and labor leaders — which includes our very own Patty Kupfer — will be in attendence at the Mercedes-Benz annual shareholders’ meeting in Berlin, Germany, to protest Daimler AG’s silence on HB 56, Alabama’s worst-in-the-nation anti-immigrant law.

Today, a delegation representing civil rights and labor leaders — which includes our very own Patty Kupfer — will be in attendence at the Mercedes-Benz annual shareholders’ meeting in Berlin, Germany, to protest Daimler AG’s silence on HB 56, Alabama’s worst-in-the-nation anti-immigrant law.

It’s been six months since Alabama began implementing its worst-in-the-nation anti-immigrant law HB 56. The Alabama state legislature has been in session since mid-February—and will only remain in session until mid-May—yet no legislative action has been taken to repeal the law.