Politico: “Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) have rekindled their alliance on immigration reform, taking some early steps to test the political will for addressing the contentious issue this year.”

During the first half of his State of the Union address last night, President Obama argued that “winning the future” would be impossible without fixing immigration. He made the case for both the DREAM Act and comprehensive immigration reform, and challenged the new Republican leadership to step up to the plate to find real solutions.

The Republican-backed Hispanic Leadership Network is hosting a conference in Florida to “provide a unique opportunity for center-right leaders to speak with—and more importantly listen to—the Hispanic community,” but the question on the minds of many political observers is: will the GOP finally hear what Latino voters have to say?

POLITICO reports that Rep. Lamar Smith, incoming Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, is looking to put a kindler, gentler face on his preferred immigration policy of mass deportation.

The House of Representatives approved the DREAM Act by 216-198. This is a huge victory for high-achieving young immigrants who want to go to college and serve in the military, and for the American values of decency, compassion and opportunity. We congratulate the House for this historic vote.

As Congress plans to take up the DREAM Act, students who would benefit join labor and immigration reform advocates as they unveil a six-figure ad buy in Spanish and English media. The ad campaign targets senators whose votes will be crucial to passing the DREAM Act.

Can the Republicans write off Latinos and take back the White House in 2012? The answer is no. Can they stand united in opposition to the popular DREAM Act in the lame duck session of Congress and block comprehensive immigration reform in the next Congress and win back Latinos? The answer is no.

A mounting array of evidence shows that the 2010 national exit poll failed to capture a representative sample of Latino voters and, resultantly, misstated levels of Latino support for candidates. However, research by Latino Decisions, conducted bilingually during the early voting period, provides a more accurate picture of Latino voter sentiment in the 2010 elections.

Thanks to the Latino firewall in the West – motivated perhaps by some candidate’s views on immigration and some smart voter mobilization efforts – the Democrats were able to keep control of the Senate, not to mention the Governors’ races in California and Colorado.

Maribel Hastings talks to voters in Florida, Nevada, Arizona and Colorado. Will the attack ads on Latino immigrants suppress the vote, or spur turnout? Tune in Wed. at 1pm to find out. While Majority Leader Reid promises to bring up the DREAM Act in the lame-duck session, Senate Republicans want to know: how much would… Continue »