Here we go again: A U.S.-born citizen deported from her own country. This time the case involves a 15-year-old girl who was sent packing from Houston to Colombia, according to published reports. Clearly, U.S.-born citizens can’t be detained by immigration officials, much less deported by the Department of Homeland Security.

Major development on immigration today, as reported by Julia Preston at the New York Times: Obama administration officials announced on Friday that they will propose a fix to a notorious snag in immigration law that will spare hundreds of thousands of American citizens from prolonged separations from immigrant spouses and children.

“A Republican probably can’t win without about 40 percent, minimum, of the Hispanic and Latino vote.” You’ve heard that many times from America’s Voice. Now, it’s coming from Larry Sabato, “a well-respected election prognosticator.”

Today on a press call, experts on Latino voters, the politics of immigration, and the DREAM Act highlighted how Mitt Romney’s recent pledge to veto the DREAM Act will imperil his chances in the general election.

Legislation in Tennessee which would amend the state’s anti-bullying law to exempt bullying for political reasons just as long as the victim’s person or property aren’t damaged. It is being denounced for aiming to give a green light to the harassment of gay kids in school, which it is.

The Republican Party’s stance on immigration—and what it means for its candidates’ ability to compete for Latino voters—is shaping up as one of the major storylines this election cycle.

Yesterday was the deadline for Maricopa Sheriff Joe Arpaio to indicate whether he would cooperate with the United States Department of Justice civil rights investigation of his department. Well, Arpaio did respond — in fairly typical Sheriff Joe fashion with some bravado and attitude

As the Republican race for the party’s presidential nomination begins and the 2012 cycle kicks off in earnest, the Party’s stance on immigration and ability to compete for Latino voters will be a major storyline. In this report, America’s Voice provides a review of GOP presidential candidate positions on immigration, finding that the field tilts hard in the anti-immigrant direction. We follow the candidate profiles with analysis of the Party’s lurch to the right on immigration in recent years, and provide four lessons for the Republican Party when it comes to Latino voters, immigration, and its potential significance for 2012 and beyond.

The Obama Administration has recently announced that it will start allowing spouses and children of U.S. citizens, who are eligible for legal status, to apply for family unity waivers in the United States. Many U.S. citizen family members currently have to travel to one of the most dangerous cities in the world, Ciudad Juárez, apply for their waiver there, and remain there while awaiting a decision.

On a press call today, experts on Latino voters, the politics of immigration, and the DREAM Act highlighted how Mitt Romney’s recent pledge to veto the DREAM Act will imperil his chances in the general election. Romney’s comments sit right at home with the GOP field, which has continued to stick to a strategy of tacking to the hard right on immigration throughout the primary season. However, as speakers discussed today, findings from an updated America’s Voice report suggest that this strategy only serves to threaten the GOP’s chances in the general election.