The Homeland Security Department will use 50 immigration agents to screen jail inmates in Arizona’s most populous county after revoking the sheriff’s authority to access its systems, the agency said Monday in a letter to Sen. Jon Kyl (R-Ariz.).

The flames are lapping higher around Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Arpaio, the self-proclaimed “America’s Toughest Sheriff” because of his controversial crackdown – at the county level – on illegal immigration, now is under fire again because of the critical condition of a man who became unresponsive while in the custody of his deputies.

Lawyers for the Justice Department and a group of 36 plaintiffs asked a federal appeals court this morning not to delay argument over the Alabama immigration law pending the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Arizona immigration law case.

Several leaders of the Roman Catholic, United Methodist and Episcopal churches in Alabama wrote a letter Monday to the governor, saying they are praying he will show political courage and support repeal of Alabama’s immigration law.

The Occupy Wall Street movement turned its attention to immigration on Sunday in honor of International Migrants Day. In rallies in New York and Los Angeles, hundreds turned out to draw attention to immigrant working rights and immigration policies.

As the Republican presidential campaign moves into the homestretch before the first caucus and primaries of the 2012 campaign, it’s increasingly clear that the candidate field is lacking a true moderate on immigration reform in the style of Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush.

While immigration advocates and immigrant communities across the nation celebrated last week’s news about Sheriff Arpaio, members of the anti-immigrant crowd were quick to circle the wagons and align themselves with the wrong side of the law. Anti-immigrant “leader” Rep. Steve King (R-IA) released no less than a video proclaiming his steadfast support of the Sheriff

As the Republican presidential campaign moves into the homestretch before the first caucus and primaries of the 2012 campaign, it’s increasingly clear that the candidate field is lacking a true moderate on immigration reform in the style of Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush. For no discernible political or policy reason beyond misguided conventional wisdom, the candidate field remains tethered to a far right immigration stance that will limit the eventual nominee’s appeal to Latino voters in the general election.

Opponents of Alabama’s immigration law marched with immigrant and civil rights leaders Saturday from the state Capitol steps to the governor’s mansion to send a message of dissatisfaction with what some were call­ing a “mean and ugly law.”

Joe Arpaio likes to call himself America’s toughest sheriff. But the Department of Justice reached a different conclusion last week about the lawman from Arizona’s Maricopa County: He helped nurture a “culture of bias” in his department, it reported after a three-year investigation, that led to discriminatory behavior and “unconstitutional policing” that routinely violated the rights of Latinos.