The Alabama immigration law took a beating last night from no less an authority than Stephen Colbert, the fake news show host who famously spent a day laboring on a farm in upstate New York last year, then testified before Congress about his experience.

Freshman Senator Marco Rubio (R-FL) remains a Tea Party favorite and, despite his protests to the contrary, the leading vice presidential candidate for the Republican Party in 2012. Central to Rubio’s appeal is his Cuban-American heritage: some believe it will attract Hispanic voters in key swing states, despite Rubio’s embrace of hardline immigration positions such as his support for mandatory E-Verify and “border security first” approaches, as well as his opposition to the federal DREAM Act.

The Wall Street Journal makes an excellent point about immigration today.

Yesterday, before Janet Napolitano was to face a number of bullying Republicans at an Oversight Hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee, Rep. Lamar Smith (R-TX) wrote an op-ed in Politico calling Obama’s record deportation numbers “a trick.”

The government hasn’t offered to help Alabama put in place a strict immigration law that the Obama administration is challenging in court, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano said Wednesday.

Alabama’s tough new law on illegal immigration was complicated even before the courts got involved. Now that federal judges have blocked parts of the act while letting others take effect, officials say uncertainty reigns even while suspects are being arrested and jailed.

Republicans who are eager to repair the party’s battered image among Hispanic voters and unseat President Obama next year have long promoted a single-barrel solution to their two-pronged problem: putting Sen. Marco Rubio on the national ticket.

Here’s a Capitol riddle for you: Representative Lamar Smith, one of the most reflexively anti-immigrant hard-liners in Congress, is sponsoring a bill to flood the agriculture sector with up to half-a-million visas for guest workers. Understand why and you’re well on your way to unpacking the nation’s dysfunctional relationship with undocumented immigrants.

Republicans at an immigration summit Wednesday in Salt Lake City said that a continuation of harsh rhetoric on the polarizing issue — notably among GOP presidential hopefuls — will cost the party the White House in 2012 — and possibly beyond.

Immigrants, those who are here legally and illegally, are important contributors to the economy on Long Island and are a relatively affluent group, according to a report to be released on Thursday.

Writing at CNN, former NY Times Editor Howell Raines, a native Alabaman, has harsh words for the state’s current Governor, Robert Bentley, and HB 56, the anti-immigrant legislation that the Governor signed into law earlier this year.