As news continues to highlight the devastation incurred by Alabama in the wake of its “Arizona on steroids” anti-immigration law, new comments by a leading anti-immigration advocate underscore an important point. In their obsession with “illegal” immigration, the anti-immigrant forces and the mostly Republican backers of laws advancing their mass-deportation agenda are well-aware and seem quite comfortable with the range of negative effects wrought by such measures.

Below are the first two columns in a series on the Alabama anti-immigration law from Maribel Hastings, Senior Advisor of America’s Voice Education Fund. These articles were originally published in Spanish on various outlets. The English-Language versions were published on Latino Voices Huffington Post.

The DREAM Act is a bill that would provide a pathway to citizenship for young students who have lived in the U.S. nearly their whole lives, who were brought here through no fault of their own. It would help educate the next generation of Americans, would generate tax dollars from improved wages, and would spur enlistment in the Armed Forces. The DREAM Act makes so much sense that even conservatives have supported it — here’s what they’ve had to say.

A federal judge has refused to block Alabama’s strict new immigration law while the Obama administration appeals a ruling last week that upholds major portions of it. Judge Sharon Lovelace Blackburn of United States District Court had upheld provisions allowing the police to ask for immigration papers during routine traffic stops.

Montgomery Public Schools’ officials said the state’s new immigration law already is having a significant impact on the system with the potential to cost students valuable class time and the system money.

Alabama’s strict new immigration law may be backfiring. Intended to force illegal workers out of jobs, it is also driving away many legal immigrant workers who work in construction and on farms doing backbreaking jobs that Americans generally won’t.

Mohamed Ali Muflahi, the first person arrested under Alabama’s strict new immigration law, is actually residing in the United States legally, his attorney proved on Monday. Muflahi, a 24-year-old born in Yemen, was arrested Friday during a drug raid in Etowah County, Alabama, along with two other Yemenis, the Gadsden Times reported last week.

In a blunt speech on Wednesday, Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano took on critics of the administration’s immigration policies on both the left and right, telling Republicans that security along the border with Mexico is “at an apex” and rejecting calls from immigrant advocacy groups to slow the pace of deportations.

Lawmakers on the House Judiciary’s immigration subpanel proposed granting American residency to foreigners who earn advanced degrees in math and science fields at a hearing on Wednesday. Darla Whitaker, a senior vice president for Texas Instruments, said her company must increasingly turn to foreign nationals to fill positions that require advanced skills.

Another day, another series of articles highlighting the devastating effects of Alabama’s immigration law. This self-inflicted wound is already wreaking havoc on the state’s reputation and economic output.