As we’ve written about in post after post, a seismic demographic change is underway in the U.S., but both political parties still seem to be ignoring the facts and their electoral implications.

The Obama Administration’s announcement that it will bring its deportation practices in line with common sense law enforcement priorities has generated the predictable outcry from mass-deportation advocates, who incorrectly have characterized the sensible policy announcement as a “backdoor amnesty.” But, immigrants should listen to Rep. Gutierrez and ICIRR, not Lamar Smith and the scam artists he’s enabling.

There’s been a lot of discussion about the Obama Administration’s new deportation policy. One thing that is crystal clear is that the policy is well within the President’s authority. At The New Republic, Nathan Pippenger explained this, and Mark Krikorian agrees.

The Obama Administration’s announcement that it will bring its deportation practices in line with common sense law enforcement priorities has generated the predictable outcry from mass-deportation advocates, who incorrectly have characterized the sensible policy announcement as a “backdoor amnesty.”

Opponents of illegal immigrants are so busy portraying the Obama administration’s new relaxed deportation policy as a back-door amnesty program that Rep. Luis Gutierrez is worried some people are going to get the wrong idea, namely the immigrants themselves.

With a call to “be patient and be careful,” U.S. Rep. Luis V. Gutierrez and pro-immigrant groups announced Tuesday a national information campaign about the significance of the Department of Homeland Security’s new deportations policy.

Minorities accounted for 98 percent of the population growth in the nation’s largest metropolitan areas over the past decade, according to a new report, as the country’s white population continued to stagnate, and in many places, decline.

A Catholic activist group criticized Alabama’s immigration law Tuesday, saying it would punish clergy for carrying out their ministerial duties. Similar arguments made by attorneys for Alabama religious leaders last week received a skeptical response from a federal judge presiding over a suit seeking to block implementation of the statute.

What does it mean when every key player in a controversial, complicated legal case agrees with a judge’s decision? That the judge got it right, of course. What the judge got right this week in the much-watched court challenge to Alabama’s new immigration law was that she needed more time to wade through all the legal arguments for and against the law, including thousands of pages of briefs.