This week, at the National Council of La Raza’s (NCLR) conference, Barack Obama once again told a crowd of Latino voters that on immigration, he couldn’t just bypass Congress to change the laws. Same old, same old, right? Except this time, the crowd responded in one unified voice. “Yes, You Can! Yes, You Can!” youth leaders, organized by United We Dream and Presente.org, chanted.

I am about to go on trial in Phoenix. One year ago, I was arrested during an act of nonviolent civil disobedience to speak out against anti-immigrant legislation in Arizona. Side by side with local activists and fellow Unitarian Universalists from across the nation, I was protesting Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio’s sweeps through Latino neighborhoods

President Obama’s recent appearance at the annual meeting of the National Council of La Raza showed how frustrated Latinos are because of the high number of deportations.But it also highlighted the reality of the limited options available in Washington’s current political climate when it comes to discussing immigration.

For some believers and church leaders, opposing Alabama’s toughest-in-the-nation law against illegal immigration is a chance for Bible Belt redemption. During the civil rights movement of the 1950s and ’60s, many state churches didn’t join the fight to end Jim Crow laws and racial segregation.

Americans are urging Congress and the Obama administration to confront the challenge of cutting unnecessary spending while creating jobs. Some in Congress aren’t getting the message.

This week, the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), the nation’s largest Latino civil rights organization, held their annual conference and invited all Presidential candidates. Here’s a short summary of what happened: President Obama showed up. The entire Republican field did not.

New comments by the head of the Republican Party demonstrate that when it comes to appealing to Latino voters, the GOP still just doesn’t get it. Republican National Committee (RNC) Chairperson Reince Priebus “dismissed the idea that the party’s support among Latinos will be hurt over immigration,” according to the Associated Press, saying, “It’s not going to hurt us one bit.”

New comments by the head of the Republican Party demonstrate that when it comes to appealing to Latino voters, the GOP still just doesn’t get it. Republican National Committee (RNC) Chairperson Reince Priebus “dismissed the idea that the party’s support among Latinos will be hurt over immigration,” according to the Associated Press, saying, “It’s not going to hurt us one bit.”

Hope Karekezi is used to getting death threats. She’s used to people stalking her home and living in fear. She came to America to breathe freely. But now, she could be deported to the country she desperately tried to escape.

While the President is a master storyteller in his own right, NCLR did not wait for Obama’s much-anticipated luncheon speech to focus on the power of narrative to illuminate fundamental, often complicated matters of immigration and citizenship.