Polling released today from Latino Decisions and impreMedia shows that Latino voters prioritize immigration, and do so because they view the issue through a personal lens. The findings hold important lessons for both political parties as the 2012 cycle begins. Among the key findings…Immigration the top priority among Latinos: when asked the single most important issue facing the Latino community and important for Congress and the President to address, 51% of respondents answered immigration. The economy and jobs comes in second place at a combined 35%.

ImpreMedia-Latino Decisions conducted a tracking poll of 500 Latino voters, which shows that Latino voters prioritize immigration, and do so because they view the issue through a personal lens. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 4.38%.

Highly skilled temporary and permanent immigrants in the United States now outnumber lower-skilled ones, marking a dramatic shift in the foreign-born workforce that could have profound political and economic implications in the national debate over immigration.

The island’s residents may not be able to vote for him on Election Day, but President Obama has good reason to head to Puerto Rico next week — and not just for the Caribbean music and the Creole cooking. When he sets down in San Juan on Tuesday, Obama will be the first president to make an official visit to Puerto Rico since John F. Kennedy went there a half-century ago.

If you follow the national debate in Washington — or, worse, on cable television — it is easy to suppose that voters base their political decisions on anger over the deficit or the prospect of Medicare privatization or some idiot congressman’s proclivity for texting racy pictures of himself to women. But that isn’t necessarily so. Those decisions and the factors underlying them often have deeper causes.

Latino voters have very real and concrete concerns about the absence of an immigration policy that addresses our times. A majority of Latinos personally know someone who is undocumented and a quarter of Latino voters say they have direct knowledge of someone who has been deported or is undergoing deportation proceedings.

A new law in Alabama authorizes police to stop and demand identification from anyone who looks like a possible illegal immigrant. The law also orders public schools to check the immigration status of their students. In Georgia, a new law cracks down on employers who evade federal requirements that they make sure of the citizenship of people they hire.

Fearful she will be deported and separated from her two young sons, Vilma Baltazar steeled her family for a long journey from her small apartment in Chamblee back to her native country, Guatemala. The single mother is one of many illegal immigrants in metro Atlanta who say they are fleeing Georgia before the state’s tough new immigration enforcement law takes effect on July 1

Last month, Georgia passed one of the harshest new immigration laws in the country. Today, the AJC reports that nearly half of the 132 Georgia businesses polled in a private survey this month say they are experiencing agricultural labor shortages.

Two of the masterminds behind the GOP’s mass deportation (of immigrants) strategy, Representatives Lamar Smith (R-TX), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee and Elton Gallegly (R-CA), chairman of the Immigration Subcommittee, are introducing new legislation intended to bring about their extremist fantasy: the expulsion of 11 million undocumented immigrants and their families.  That’s what their… Continue »