The Spanish-language press recognizes the success of the DREAM movement in getting officials to suspend certain deportations, but activists point out that students will still be deported until the federal government takes action to help them — which President Obama told a fundraising dinner he would do “something” about after the November elections. Meanwhile, on the border, arrests are down, deaths are up, and residents feel safe, but Secure Communities continues to expand anyway.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement has touted an 18-month-old program under which county jails forward suspects’ fingerprints to Homeland Security as a key tool in quickly identifying dangerous foreign criminals.

As Lindsey Graham and his fellow Republicans explain it, their sudden turn against conferring citizenship on anyone born in the United States was prompted by the mortal threat of “anchor babies” — the children of foreigners who scurry to the States just in time to give birth to U.S. citizens.

More than one-fourth of illegal immigrants deported from the United States under a federal program that supporters touted as a way to identify and deport dangerous criminals were not convicted of crimes, according to government reports released Tuesday.

President Barack Obama has lost the most trusted man in the Hispanic media.

Univision’s Jorge Ramos, an anchor on the nation’s largest Spanish-language television network, says Obama broke his promise to produce an immigration reform bill within a year of taking office.

Three recent polls of Latino voters show how the current immigration debate—including the national attention to Arizona’s anti-immigrant law—has dramatically influenced Latino voters’ view of political candidates, as well as their propensity to vote in November.

A new summary of recent Latino voter polls highlights the way the immigration debate is influencing Latino political engagement in the run-up to the November mid-terms. The lack of action on comprehensive immigration could dampen enthusiasm among Latino voters at a crucial time.

Eva Longoria, Rosario Dawson, and Wilmer Valderrama are using their star-power to speak out against Arizona’s controversial immigration law and are encouraging young voters to storm the polls on election day in November.

At the President’s request, bipartisan majorities in the House and Senate are about to send millions more taxpayer dollars to the broken border. It’s no coincidence that this ’emergency supplemental’ is on the agenda just before the August recess. We’ve read this story before, and we know how it ends. The bill will be approved and politicians will go home and brag to their constituents about how tough they are, without solving a thing.

The Catholic tradition often speaks of the “dignity of the human person,” and we hear it so often that it’s easy to lose sight of the pressing urgency and implications of this mandate.